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Monthly Archives: June 2018

Pebble Walls Tiles

Quick overview
Pebble Walls Tiles are created by assembling together similar interlocking stones that are attached onto a 12″ mesh backing, thus providing that seamless desired tile. Whether it is their exotic look or their variety of colors, one thing is for sure – most of these imported tiles are originated from one part of the world – that is the S.E Asian islands. Practically, it enables you to coat any desired surface you choose: Kitchen backsplashes, bathrooms and showers, fireplaces, swimming pools and more.

Main benefits
This tiling technique undoubtedly transforms surface decoration fast and effective, providing several important advantages:
* Durable to most common home detergents.
* Made of natural durable stones that hold for many years ahead.
* Durable to any extreme temperatures such as around fireplaces and stoves for example.

Practical tips to go!
* Order a small sample of the desired tiles prior to making a complete order – just to make sure it answers your expectations.
* In order to maintain these natural stones properly, it is recommended to apply sealants every two to three years.
* If you want to enhance the color of the stones transforming it glossy or matte finish, use natural stone color enhancer right before applying the sealer.

On the bottom line
Pebble Walls Tiles redecoration isn’t just about a tedious technical installation, it is fun and full of satisfaction. There are probably many other pluses provided by this quick redecoration option, simply because it offers countless opportunities for professional and unprofessional installers whether they decorate at home or in the office. As mentioned earlier installation is quite easy, however, it is advised to keep the above tips before you begin with installation.

Designing Log Home

MECHANICALS: Open floor plans are the essence of the modern log home. They make a home feel larger, and keep the cook from feeling isolated. However, if you have a second floor you need to consider how you are going to get the plumbing, the electric and the ductwork (both supply and return) to the upstairs rooms. You won’t be using the exterior walls for that, so you need to create enough interior walls downstairs to fit all the mechanicals. Each object in all likelihood will take its own space between the 2x4s. Even if you use radiant-floor heating, you’ll need ductwork for the air conditioning. There are some systems that use high-pressure ductwork much smaller in diameter than conventional ducts, so there are other possibilities if you are pressed for space. But the best solution is to think ahead. If you’re tempted to use an interior full-log wall (or none at all), you may be sacrificing an opportunity to get more ductwork upstairs.

PLUMBING: The wisest floor plans are the ones that try to keep the bathrooms together (either back-to-back or one directly above the other) and the shortest runs on the plumbing. This can’t always be done, but when placing the upstairs bathroom, try to line it up with an interior downstairs wall. This way the plumbing doesn’t have to snake all over the place.

CLOSETS: I would venture to guess that log homes are usually notoriously short on closet space. I know my home is. First of all, it would be a terrible waste to put a closet against an exterior log wall. Why hide your beautiful logs? And because we try to keep the square footage down to a minimum, it almost seems a crime to waste precious space on closets. However, there’s more than one reason to include them. Not only do we seem to collect more stuff as we get older, but by law in several states the closet determines whether a room is a bedroom or an office. This could affect the resale (or refinancing) of your house. Here is a suggestion: put two closets side-by-side on the wall separating two rooms; the closets may not be huge, but it doesn’t change the shape of the rooms. Try to include a coat closet near your front door.

WINDOWS: As I’m sure you’ve already read many times, you can’t have too many windows in a log home. The wood sucks up the light like a sponge. If you have a large empty wall, the insertion of a window near the peak not only lets in more light, it adds character. Some people add windows along either side of a shed dormer. In my case, I had to move the roof line to increase the size of my bedroom window, because by code it needed to be 6′ square for egress. In any upstairs bedroom you’ll need your windows to be large enough to climb out in case of fire. Also remember that too many direct-set windows will decrease the amount of air flow to your upstairs. In my house I added an awning (a small hinged window) to the bottom of stationery windows in my dormers. This helped let air in, but even so the rooms can be stuffy. A ceiling fan helps, but ultimately I may need to add a skylight to create a draft.

Painting Kitchen Cabinets

All professional paint stores will have a multitude of color card samples to help you make your choice. Usually several different paint manufacturers ranges will be available. So gather them up and head on home to browse through them at your lesisure.When you have made a choice, perhaps even two, give your self and/or designer brain time to reflect and the next day have a look at them again. If your number one choice is still your favorite then it’s time to head on over to make your purchase. Remember taking your time at each stage of the planning process will avoid costly errors and disappointments.

People often take the easy option when choosing paint colors, especially if they are not expert at visualizing the finished product.

Neutral colors are fine up to a point, but for a dramatic, pleasing and vibrant kitchen it’s time to be adventurous. The main colors in your kitchen will be the flooring, cabinets and counter tops. So a really great idea is to look at the possibility of complementing these swathes of color with a new wall color that helps them stand out.

If the kitchen is a place where you spend a good deal of time alone, then a less dramatic approach will be more restful. So think about this Dramatic or Restful and choose your paint to reflect this idea. Your kitchen will then not only be a place where you can show off your talents to the masses but you’ll be relaxed and stress free when you are home alone!

Small Kit Homes

Advantages of Using a Kit Home Package

If you’re planning to build a small home, it might seem like there’s not that much to it so why would you need to use a packaged home product? But, the fact is, regardless of the size of the home, there are still the same choices to be made, a variety of materials to purchase, and the same contractors to hire. Lets look at some benefits:

  • Reduced decisions make the preparation process easier and quicker
  • Quicker framing can lower the onsite labor costs
  • Complete materials packages can reduce the need to shop
  • Some companies offer easier access to construction financing
  • A kit home can make a DIY project more doable

Packaged Kit Home Disadvantages

Small or big, the same issues arise when building a home. And it’s a mistake to think that just because the home is small, or because you’re using a kit home that you won’t have issues and problems to solve. I’ve found the following to be common:

  • Wall framing panels don’t always fit together perfectly
  • There’s a decent price mark-up for labor and deliveries
  • Your materials and style choices are limited
  • Your site must be accessible for big truck deliveries
  • You’ll need to safely store many items onsite while building

Use These Suggestions to Improve Your Experience

After years of working with kit homes, panelized houses, and small home designs, I can offer the following tips and strategies that will make your life easier.

  • Consider hiring your own home building coach to help with management rather than using the kit home company’s rep
  • Pick one of their package designs if your local restrictions allow it and don’t deviate from the plans
  • Choose a design with a simple foundation and roof design
  • Try to visit a finished home which is the same or similar to the model you chose
  • Use framers who are experienced with framing packaged homes